Travel Advice

Through the “Travel Advice Sheet” the High Commission informs Maldivians of potential precautions to take while travelling in Malaysia.
Travel Advice : [sdm_download id=”366″ fancy=”0″]

SUMMARY
  • If you are coming to Malaysia for studies you are required to obtain a Student Pass (Visa)
  • approval through your educational institution before your arrival in Malaysia.
  • The Malaysian authorities regularly forewarn and create awareness through the local media about scams and cheating, involving theft, gambling, etc.
  • Do not overstay. Overstaying in Malaysia after the expiry or cancellation of visa can lead to heavy amount of fines and/or imprisonment of not more than 5 years.
  • Malaysian Immigration rules require you to carry your passport at all times unless you have an I-Kad or Work Permit or a valid Malaysian Immigration issued identification.
  • Malaysian Health Ministry reported in November 2008 that Dengue and Chikungunya cases are on the rise in Malaysia including the state of Selangor.
  • The High Commission receives a significant number of reports of stolen, lost or damaged passports. You are advised to take all necessary precautions to keep your passport safe.

ENTRY
Visiting Malaysia as a tourist
Maldivian nationals do not need a visa to enter Malaysia as a social visitor. On entry, you are
normally given a 30-days visa, which may be extended by a further 30 days by the Immigration
authorities.

Visas for longer stay or for non-tourist purposes must be obtained from the nearest Malaysian
diplomatic mission before travel or through the Headquarters of the Malaysian Department of
Immigration in Putrajaya.

Student Visa
Information about Student Pass (Visa) and other visas are available on the Malaysian Immigration
website www.imi.gov.my. The educational institute in which you enrol will assist in arranging your
student visa. Please check with the particular institute to obtain details of the procedure to be
followed. The basic procedure for obtaining a Student Pass is available on the High Commission
website.

Malaysian immigration authorities grant Social Visit Pass only to immediate family members of
students who are pursuing Post-Graduate courses. Requests for social visit pass for
immediate family members of Undergraduate or other students are considered on a case by case
basis by the Malaysian immigration authorities. However, with a supporting letter from the High
Commission, visa is normally granted to immediate family members.

Overstaying
Please ensure that you do not overstay your visa.Also do not breach the terms of your visa (eg.
engaging in employment when your visa terms clearly forbid you to do so) Overstaying in
Malaysia after the expiry or cancellation of visa can lead to a fine of not less RM 10,000
and/or imprisonment of not more than 5 years. You may be refused re-entry based on
previous record of overstaying.

The Malaysian authorities are regularly run vigorous campaigns against illegal immigrants and
therefore inspect immigration documents, such as work permits, very closely. Malaysian immigration
authorities have routinely detained foreigners who have overstayed their visas.

Malaysian Immigration rules require you to carry your passport at all times unless you
have a valid Malaysian Immigration issued identification such as an I-Kad or Work
Permit.

If you are a student check with your college when you would be issued your I-Kad.
Also, check your visa status periodically while in Malaysia and strictly follow immigration
regulations and laws.

Passport
Your passports should have minimum 6 months validity or entry may be refused. If you are
travelling from Peninsular Malaysia to East Malaysia (Sabah and Sarawak) you need to carry
your passport to enter East Malaysia. The High Commission receives a significant number of
reports of stolen, lost or damaged passports. You are advised to take all necessary
precautions to keep your passport safe.

General
Foreigners are now required to fill an embarkation/disembarkation card when entering
Malaysia. You must keep the disembarkation potion of the card to show on departure.

Health
If you are bringing in prescribed medicines for personal use, please ensure that you carry it in
your hand luggage and have the doctor’s prescription ready at hand to show to the
immigration authorities if required.Check with your doctor what vaccinations or other
health precautions you may need before travelling. It is advisable that you obtain comprehensive
medical/travel insurance covering all eventualities, before travelling as medical care in private
hospitals can be very expensive.

Take precautions against periodic outbreaks of diseases such as Dengue Fever, Hand Foot and
Mouth Disease (HFMD) and Chikungunya. The most recent large-scale outbreaks of HFMD were in
Sarawak in July 2006.

Dengue and Chikungunya is endemic in certain parts of Malaysia, including Selangor and other
major population centres. Malaysian Health Ministry reported in November, that Dengue
and Chikungunya cases are on the rise.Chikungunya and Dengue are caused by Aedes
mosquitoes, and there is no vaccination or immunisation. The disease can be prevented by
using insect repellents, mosquito coils/mats/nets and proper clothing that cover your body. For
further information on precautions against specific diseases check the WHO website
http://www.who.int/en/.

Specific information on:
Chikungunya:
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs327/en/index.html
Dengue:
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs117/en/index.html

Firearms
The importation of unlicensed firearms and ammunition into Malaysia is prohibited. Possession
can carry the death penalty.

Exchange Control

You are allowed to bring in or take out up to 1,000 Malaysian Ringgit per person without prior
approval. There are no limits on the amount of foreign currency (notes and or travellers’ cheques)
you may import. Non-residents may export foreign currency (notes and or travellers’ cheques) up to
the amount they previously imported, provided they have documentary evidence of the amount
they imported. Penalties for offences under the Exchange Control Act 1953 are a fine of up to
10,000 Malaysian Ringgit, three years’ imprisonment or both.

SAFETY AND SECURITY
Kuala Lumpur is a large cosmopolitan city and as such you are advised to take every safety
precaution that you may take in any large city.These would include being aware of the dangers of
various street crimes such as pick pocketing, bag snatching, etc. to which you may be exposed.
The Malaysian authorities regularly forewarn and create awareness through the local media about
scams and cheating. Common forms of scams and cheating involve text messages or emails informing
that have you won a contest, requesting your assistance for transfer of funds, selling ‘winning’
tickets for cash, etc.

Some suggestions that you may like to take
note of:
•    Be aware of scams such as text messages or emails informing that you have won a contest, requesting your assistance for transfer of funds, selling ‘winning’ tickets for cash, carjacking of vehicles after staging accidents, etc
•    Malaysian Immigration reports of incidences of scams involving imposters who pose as immigration officers claiming they can arrange visa for a fee.
•    Don’t give out your personal details or bank card information to unknown people, in person, via email, phone or sms.
•    Don’t let unsolicited sales or marketing people into your homes.
•    Take particular care of your passport, as passport loss and damage is significantly high.
•    Avoid carrying valuables with you and be aware of your surroundings when you are out on the streets.
•    Do not leave possessions in an unattended vehicle.
•    There are reports of Credit/Debit card fraud. Therefore, take great care when making payments by credit card or withdrawing money from ATM .

Police permission is required for certain kinds of public gatherings in Malaysia. You should
therefore avoid street gatherings and demonstrations, which might place you at risk.
Between the months of October to February Malaysia is affected by seasonal storms, which
occasionally result in heavy flooding. Heavy flooding is also experienced in parts of Kuala
Lumpur and surrounding Klang Valley area.

Local Customs
While Malaysia is a multicultural society, it is also predominantly a Muslim country. As a Maldivian
you probably are aware of religious sensitivities that may be prevalent in Malaysia. As a Muslim
you may also be subjected to local Shari’a law.

Driving
To drive in Malaysia, you require a Malaysian Driving Licence or an International Driving License.
The Malaysian Road Transport Department informs the High Commission that Maldivian Drivers
License is recognized as a valid license to drive in Malaysia. You can obtain a letter validating your
Maldivian license from us. Please view ourwebsite’s FAQ section on Transport (While in Malaysia>Transport>FAQ) for further information.